Top 8 places to visit in Indonesia

4 min reads

 

Bali

  A place that really needs no introduction, Bali has long been a mecca for travelers eager to sample the mysterious east and while the influx of Aussies and Brits has taken its toll on spots like Kuta in the south, there do remain pockets of the earthy, aga (ancient) Bali here too.

  Anyone who travels to Bali is going to have warm sand and blue water on their mind, and the island doesn’t disappoint. Kuta is the best known beach, and is great for those who like to combine sun, surfing, and socializing. Because of its popularity, you’ll find no shortage of restaurants and things to do here.

 

Gili Islands

  A trio of picture-perfect islands that string their way out between Lombok and Bali in the middle of the Nusa Tenggara archipelago, the Gilis are oft hailed as the most quintessential tropical spots on the planet. If you’re looking for more turtle action, you can check out a turtle hatchery where hundreds of these creatures are born each year.

Kayaking is also popular in the Gilis, and if you’re seeking a place to reconnect with your mind and body, you will find several options for yoga classes. The Gili Islands provide a more relaxed, though still stimulating, alternative to popular Bali.

 

Lombok

  Lombok has risen and risen out of obscurity in the last couple of decades to become something of the thinking man’s alternative to Bali.

  With less of the gaudy bars and super clubs of Kuta, this one retains the rustic, ramshackle feel of old Indonesia. Make a beeline for salt-washed Senggigi on the western shore.

  Here, traditional warung (homey local taverns) serve up spicy noodle fries and peanut-packed sate dishes close to the shore.There are surfing opportunities aplenty too, from Kuta Lombok in the south to the pretty coves that fringe the coconut groves all along the west coast.

 

Mount Bromo

  Indonesia sits on the Ring of Fire, an area with some of the most active volcanoes in the world. Many of the country’s volcanoes, such as Mount Merapi, are famous for their violent eruptions and their stunning, but dangerous beauty.

  The volcano is part of Bromo Tengger Semeru National Park, which also includes Mount Semeru, the highest peak in Java. The park is home to the Tengger people, an isolated ethnic group who trace their ancestry back to the ancient Majapahit empire.

 

Borobudur

  Colossal stupas carved from graphite-hued stone tower overhead; mysterious reliefs depicting old Buddhist tales mark the rocks in front.

  Borobudur was built in the 8th century and constructed in the shape of a traditional Buddhist mandala. It is one of the top UNESCO World Heritage sites, and is considered one of the greatest Buddhist sites in the world.

  The massive temple was forgotten for centuries, when it is believed that much of the population moved to eastern Java due to volcanic eruptions. But it was rediscovered in the 1800s and, today, is one of the main draws in Java.

 

Tana Toraja

  Delve into the earthy tribal cultures of South Sulawesi with a trip to the enthralling town of Tana Toraja.

  The architectural style of Tongkonan, boat-shaped houses and other buildings, are immediate standouts, but the people are what make this piece of natural paradise so special. They are, by many accounts, the friendliest and most welcoming people you could hope to meet while traveling.

 

Kalimantan, Borneo

  Few places suggest wild, untamed adventure like Borneo. One of the most ecologically diverse places on earth, Borneo is home to orangutans, exotic birds, Sumatran rhinos, pygmy elephants, and an array of other creatures.

  In Kalimantan, in Indonesian Borneo, you can travel down the Kapuas River, the longest in Indonesia; visit villages of the indigenous Dayak people; and observe foreign influences from China, Malaysia, and even Europe in the ports and cities along the way.

 

isen out of obscurity in the last couple of decades to become something of the thinking man’s alternative to Bali.

  With less of the gaudy bars and super clubs of Kuta, this one retains the rustic, ramshackle feel of old Indonesia. Make a beeline for salt-washed Senggigi on the western shore.

  Here, traditional warung (homey local taverns) serve up spicy noodle fries and peanut-packed sate dishes close to the shore.There are surfing opportunities aplenty too, from Kuta Lombok in the south to the pretty coves that fringe the coconut groves all along the west coast.

 

Mount Bromo

  Indonesia sits on the Ring of Fire, an area with some of the most active volcanoes in the world. Many of the country’s volcanoes, such as Mount Merapi, are famous for their violent eruptions and their stunning, but dangerous beauty.

  The volcano is part of Bromo Tengger Semeru National Park, which also includes Mount Semeru, the highest peak in Java. The park is home to the Tengger people, an isolated ethnic group who trace their ancestry back to the ancient Majapahit empire.

 

Borobudur

  Colossal stupas carved from graphite-hued stone tower overhead; mysterious reliefs depicting old Buddhist tales mark the rocks in front.

  Borobudur was built in the 8th century and constructed in the shape of a traditional Buddhist mandala. It is one of the top UNESCO World Heritage sites, and is considered one of the greatest Buddhist sites in the world.

  The massive temple was forgotten for centuries, when it is believed that much of the population moved to eastern Java due to volcanic eruptions. But it was rediscovered in the 1800s and, today, is one of the main draws in Java.

 

Tana Toraja

  Delve into the earthy tribal cultures of South Sulawesi with a trip to the enthralling town of Tana Toraja.

  The architectural style of Tongkonan, boat-shaped houses and other buildings, are immediate standouts, but the people are what make this piece of natural paradise so special. They are, by many accounts, the friendliest and most welcoming people you could hope to meet while traveling.

 

Kalimantan, Borneo

  Few places suggest wild, untamed adventure like Borneo. One of the most ecologically diverse places on earth, Borneo is home to orangutans, exotic birds, Sumatran rhinos, pygmy elephants, and an array of other creatures.

  In Kalimantan, in Indonesian Borneo, you can travel down the Kapuas River, the longest in Indonesia; visit villages of the indigenous Dayak people; and observe foreign influences from China, Malaysia, and even Europe in the ports and cities along the way.

 

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